JavaScript Fundamentals: Development for Absolute Beginners

By: Bob Tabor

Download the entire series source code here.

JavaScript Fundamentals

This course is divided in 21 parts:

  1. Series Introduction
  2. Writing your First JavaScript Application
  3. Dissecting the First JavaScript Application You Wrote
  4. Writing JavaScript in Visual Web Developer Express Edition
  5. JavaScript Variables, Types, Operators, and Expressions
  6. Conditional Logic in JavaScript
  7. JavaScript Functions
  8. JavaScript Arrays
  9. Looping Statements in JavaScript
  10. Understanding Function versus Global Scope
  11. Working with External JavaScript Files
  12. Organizing and Simplifying JavaScript with Object Literals
  13. Understanding the Document Object Model
  14. Getting Started with jQuery
  15. jQuery Selectors
  16. jQuery Events
  17. Installing and Utilizing jQuery Plugins
  18. Unobtrusive JavaScript
  19. Using jQuery to Retrieve JSON via AJAX
  20. Fundamentals of JavaScript Closures
  21. Series Wrap-Up

URL: http://channel9.msdn.com/Series/Javascript-Fundamentals-Development-for-Absolute-Beginners

Source: Channel 9

CSS3 – Substring matching attribute selectors

[att^=val] : Represents an element with the att attribute whose value begins with the prefix “val”.

[att$=val] : Represents an element with the att attribute whose value ends with the suffix “val”.

[att*=val] : Represents an element with the att attribute whose value contains at least one instance of the substring “val”.

This whole group of selectors is new, and the selectors in it let developers match substrings in the value of an attribute.

Assume that we have an HTML document that contains the following markup structure:
<div id=”nav-primary”></div>
<div id=”content-primary”></div>
<div id=”content-secondary”></div>
<div id=”tertiary-content”></div>
<div id=”nav-secondary”></div>

By using the substring matching attribute selectors we can target combinations of these structural parts of the document.

The following rule will set the background colour of all div elements whose id begins with “nav”:
div[id^=”nav”] { background:#ff0; }

In this case the selector will match div#nav-primary and div#nav-secondary.

To target the div elements whose id ends with “primary”, we could use the following rule:
div[id$=”primary”] { background:#ff0; }

This time the selector will match div#nav-primary and div#content-primary.

The following rule will apply to all div elements whose id contain the substring “content”:
div[id*=”content”] { background:#ff0; }

The elements that will be affected by this rule are div#content-primary, div#content-secondary, and div#tertiary-content.

The substring matching attribute selectors are all fully supported by the latest versions of Mozilla, Chrome, Firefox, Safari and Opera.

Reference: http://www.456bereastreet.com/archive/200601/css_3_selectors_explained/

jQuery Cheat Sheet

Remembering the hundreds of jQuery methods and handlers can melt your brain. Use this cheat sheet as a reference.

jQuery Cheat Sheet
jQuery Cheat Sheet

Source: Colorcharge.com

CSS Hacks – Browser Specific Selectors

CSS Browser Selector givesĀ us the ability to write specific CSS code for each operating system and each browser. To send different CSS rules to IE, we can use the child selector command, which IE can’t understand. The child selector command involves two elements, one of which is the child of the other. So, html>body refers to the child, body, contained within the parent, html.

Here is the list of some useful browser specific selectors when we need to change a style in one browser but not the others.

IE 6 and below

* html {}

IE 7 and below

*:first-child+html {} * html {}

IE 7 only

*:first-child+html {}

IE 7 and modern browsers only

html>body {}

Modern browsers only (not IE 7)

html>/**/body {}

Opera versions 9 and below

html:first-child {}

Safari

html[xmlns*=””] body:last-child {}

Place the code in front of the style to use these selectors.
For example:

#content-box {
width: 300px;
height: 150px;
}

* html #content-box {
width: 350px;
} /* overrides the above style and changes the width to 350px in IE 6 and below */